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Am J Prev Med. 2013 Nov;45(5):598-605. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2013.07.006.

The Seamos Saludables study: A randomized controlled physical activity trial of Latinas.

Author information

  • 1Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, California. Electronic address: bmarcus@ucsd.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Latinas in the U.S. are less physically active than non-Latino white women and also report higher levels of diabetes, obesity, and other conditions related to inactivity. Interventions are needed to address disparities in this high-risk group.

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the efficacy of a culturally adapted, Spanish-language, individually tailored, computer expert system-driven physical activity print-based intervention for adult Latinas.

DESIGN:

RCT.

SETTING/PARTICIPANTS:

Participants were 266 inactive adult Latinas who participated between 2009 and 2012.

INTERVENTION:

Participants were randomized to one of two treatment arms: a 6-month tailored physical activity intervention condition or wellness contact control. For both conditions, print materials were delivered by mail.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The main outcome measure was change in weekly moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) measured by the 7-Day Physical Activity Recall interview, which was administered at baseline and post-intervention (6 months). Participants also wore accelerometers for a week at baseline and follow-up. Analyses were conducted in 2013.

RESULTS:

Increases in minutes/week of MVPA measured by the 7-Day PAR were significantly greater in the intervention group compared to the control group (mean difference=41.36, SE=7.93, p<0.01). This difference was corroborated by accelerometer readings (rho=0.44, p<0.01). Further, results indicate that intervention participants had greater increases in self-efficacy, cognitive processes, and behavioral processes at 3 months compared to control paricipants (p's<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

The tailored Spanish-language intervention was effective in increasing MVPA among predominantly low-income, less-acculturated Latinas. Such print-based interventions are poised for widespread dissemination, and thus may help address health disparities.

© 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

PMID:
24139773
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3864768
[Available on 2014/11/1]
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