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J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2014 Nov;24(6):572-8. doi: 10.1038/jes.2013.65. Epub 2013 Oct 9.

Permethrin exposure from fabric-treated military uniforms under different wear-time scenarios.

Author information

  • 11] Military Performance Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA, USA [2] Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA [3] VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA.
  • 21] Military Performance Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA, USA [2] Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
  • 3Military Performance Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA, USA.

Abstract

The objective of the project was to ascertain whether urinary biomarkers of permethrin exposure are detected after wearing post-tailored, fabric-treated military uniforms under two different wear-time exposure scenarios. Study A occurred over 3.5 days and involved six participants wearing treated uniforms continuously for 30-32 h. Urine collection occurred at scheduled time points before, during, and after wearing the uniform. Study B, conducted over 19 days, included 11 participants wearing treated uniforms for 3 consecutive days, 8 h each day (with urine collection before, during, and after wear). Urinary biomarkers of permethrin (3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA), cis- 2,2-(dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (cDCCA), trans- 2,2-(dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (tDCCA)) were detected during and after wear. Biomarker detection generally occurred over the 10- to 12-h period after putting on the uniform and subsided 24 h following uniform removal (in both Study A and B scenarios). Those wearing permethrin-treated uniforms under the longer wear-time scenario (Study A) excreted significantly higher cumulative mean levels compared with those in Study B (3.29 times higher for 3PBA and 2.23 times higher for the sum of c/tDCCA (P≤0.001)). Findings suggest that wearing permethrin-treated clothing does increase absorbed, internal dose levels of permethrin above population levels and is significantly related to wear-time duration.

PMID:
24104061
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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