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Mater Sociomed. 2013;25(2):113-7. doi: 10.5455/msm.2013.25.113-117.

Assessment of Reporting, Attitudes and Knowledge About the Stab Incidents and Professional Risk of Viral Infection among Health Care Professionals in Primary Health Care.

Author information

  • 1, Department of Occupational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tuzla , Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina ; , Department of Occupational Pathology and Toxicology, Primary Health Care Centre Tuzla , Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Abstract

CONFLICT OF INTEREST:

none declared.

GOAL:

The goal of the research is to determine the relationship between frequency and reporting of stab incidents, attitudes and knowledge about stab incidents and occupational risk for transmission of viral infection with HBV, HCV or HIV among health care professionals employed in primary health care.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Conducted is prospective, cross-section study by questionnaires in 2012. The survey included health professionals in Primary Health Care Center in Tuzla. The final sample has 131 respondents (85% women). Statistical analysis was performed using the statistical package SPSS version 20.0.

RESULTS:

The prevalence rate of stab incidents throughout their career in our study was 66%; while the rate of reported incidents was 4.83 ˜ 5 times lower than the actual prevalence. In 49 out of 87 cases this was a case of hollow needle prick. The most common causes of stab incidents are the time pressure, unforeseen reactions of patients and lack of concentration.

CONCLUSION:

Stab incidents are often not reported in in developing countries. Training in order to raise awareness and knowledge about the problem, proper procedures, good organization of work and anti-stress program, safer disposal, conducting prophylaxis before and after exposure monitored by the relevant institutions of occupational medicine should contribute to solving this problem.

KEYWORDS:

blood transmitted infections; incident; occupational risk

PMID:
24082835
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3769157
Free PMC Article
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