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J Urol. 2014 Feb;191(2):372-5. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2013.09.033. Epub 2013 Sep 23.

Relationship between C-reactive protein and kidney stone prevalence.

Author information

  • 1Departments of Urology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, and Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School (BHE), Boston, Massachusetts.
  • 2Departments of Urology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, and Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School (BHE), Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: beisner@partners.org.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We evaluated the relationship between serum C-reactive protein and the lifetime kidney stone prevalence.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We performed a cross-sectional study of participants from the Continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2007 to 2008 and 2008 to 2009. Data were available on 11,033 participants.

RESULTS:

On univariate analysis we noted a strong correlation between C-reactive protein quintile and kidney stone history. After adjusting for known confounders multivariate logistic regression revealed a significant relationship between C-reactive protein and the lifetime prevalence of kidney stones in younger individuals (age 20 to 39 years, p for trend = 0.002). In individuals 20 to 39 years old the lifetime prevalence of kidney stones increased with increasing C-reactive protein quintile (p = 0.002 for trend), specifically, those in the third quintile (OR 3.86, 95% CI 1.07-13.88, p = 0.04) and the fifth quintile (OR 3.85, 95% CI 1.46-10.17, p = 0.009). The fourth quintile of C-reactive protein approached statistical significance (OR 2.56, 95% CI 0.96-6.81, p = 0.059). The relationship between C-reactive protein and kidney stone history was not significant in the older age groups (40 to 59 and 60 years or greater).

CONCLUSIONS:

There exists a significant relationship between serum C-reactive protein and self-reported kidney stones in younger individuals. This may shed light on potential mechanisms of stone formation in this age group and help gain a better understanding of stone risk mediators. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms underlying these epidemiological findings.

Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

BMI; C-reactive protein; CRP; age groups; body mass index; kidney; nephrolithiasis; nutrition surveys

PMID:
24071479
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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