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J Pediatr. 2013 Dec;163(6):1596-604. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.08.011. Epub 2013 Sep 24.

Preterm birth and adolescent social functioning-alterations in emotion-processing brain areas.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's Health Partners, King's College London, London, United Kingdom; Lucena Clinic Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service, Rathgar, Dublin, Ireland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the relationship between preterm birth, adolescent, and adult psychosocial outcomes, and alterations in gray matter volume.

STUDY DESIGN:

Individuals (n = 73) born at <33 weeks of gestation (very preterm) and 49 controls completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) at age 15 years to identify 'social immaturity' (SI) cases. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate gray matter volumes according to CBCL-SI 'caseness.' The Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R) was administered at age 19 years.

RESULTS:

Very preterm adolescents were almost 4 times more likely to reach CBCL-SI 'caseness' compared with controls. Ex-preterm SI 'cases' had increased gray matter volume in the fusiform gyrus bilaterally (Talairach coordinates: x = 60, y = -27, z = -30; Z = 3.78; x = -61, y = -35, z = -27; Z = 3.56, after correction for multiple comparisons) compared with ex-preterm SI 'noncases.' Left fusiform volume displayed a stronger correlation with ipsilateral orbitofrontal cortex in SI 'cases' (x = -15, y = 22, z = -26; Z = 3.64). CIS-R total scores were slightly higher in ex-preterm individuals compared with controls. In the whole sample, SI 'cases' in midadolescence also had higher CIS-R scores in adulthood compared with 'noncases' (SI 'cases': mean = 5.7, 95% CI = 4.0-7.4; SI 'noncases': mean = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.1-4.3; F = 6.4, df = 74; P = .013).

CONCLUSIONS:

Ex-preterm adolescents had increased socialization problems in adolescence, which were associated with volumetric alterations in an emotion-processing brain network. Atypical social development is linked to an increased vulnerability to psychiatric disorder.

Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

ASD; Autism spectrum disorder; CBCL; CIS-R; Child Behavior Checklist; Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised; FWE; Family wise error; MRI; Magnetic resonance imaging; SES; SI; Social economic status; Social immaturity; VPT; Very preterm

PMID:
24070828
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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