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Int J Mol Med. 2013 Nov;32(5):989-94. doi: 10.3892/ijmm.2013.1503. Epub 2013 Sep 20.

Green tea with high-density catechins improves liver function and fat infiltration in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients: a double-blind placebo-controlled study.

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  • 1Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume 830-0011, Japan.

Abstract

Catechins, a major component of green tea extract, have anti-hyperlipidemic effects. The present study investigated the effects of consumption of green tea with high-density catechins in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients. Seventeen patients with NAFLD consumed green tea with high-density catechins, low-density catechins or a placebo for 12 weeks in a randomized double-blind study. Ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) were performed at baseline and after 12 weeks. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and urine 8-isoprostane were monitored and compared to baseline at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Body fat was significantly decreased in the high-density catechin group compared with the placebo and low-density catechin groups after 12 weeks of consumption. All the patients in the high-density catechin group showed a significantly improved liver-to-spleen CT attenuation ratio compared with the placebo and low-density catechin groups after 12 weeks of consumption. The high-density catechin group significantly decreased serum ALT levels and reduced urinary 8-isoprostane excretion compared with the placebo and low-density catechin group after 12 weeks of consumption. Based on a reduced proportion of body fat as estimated by bioimpedance measurement, increased liver-to-spleen CT attenuation ratio, decreased serum ALT levels and reduced urinary 8-isoprostane excretion, we concluded that 12 weeks of 700 ml per day of green tea containing >1 g catechin improved liver fat content and inflammation by reducing oxidative stress in patients with NAFLD.

PMID:
24065295
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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