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Biosens Bioelectron. 2014 Feb 15;52:143-6. doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2013.08.033. Epub 2013 Aug 27.

Alcohol vapour detection at the three phase interface using enzyme-conducting polymer composites.

Author information

  • 1Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Australia. Electronic address: orawan.winther-jensen@monash.edu.

Abstract

Immobilisation of enzymes on a breathable electrode can be useful for various applications where the three-phase interface between gas or chemical vapour, electrolyte and electrode is crucial for the reaction. In this paper, we report the further development of the breathable electrode concept by immobilisation of alcohol dehydrogenase into vapour-phase polymerised poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) that has been coated onto a breathable membrane. Typical alcohol sensing, whereby the coenzyme β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is employed as a redox-mediator, was successfully used as a model reaction for the oxidation of ethanol. This indicates that the ethanol vapour from the backside of the membrane has access to the active enzyme embedded in the electrode. The detecting range of the sensor is suitable for the detection of ethanol in fruit juices and for the baseline breath ethanol concentration of drunken driving. After continuous operation for 4.5h the system only showed a 20% decrease in the current output. The electrodes maintained 62% in current output after being refrigerated for 76 days. This work is continuing the progress of the immobilisation of specific enzymes for certain electrochemical reactions whereby the three-phase interface has to be maintained and/or the simultaneous separation of gas from liquid is required.

© 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Biological materials; Breathable electrode; Gas separation; PEDOT; Stuffing method

PMID:
24055930
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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