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Hernia. 2013 Sep 19. [Epub ahead of print]

Outcome in porcine acellular dermal matrix reinforcement of infected abdominal wall defects: a prospective study.

Author information

  • 1Department of General Surgery and Transplantation, CHU, Université Nord de France, 59000, Lille, France, philippe.zerbib@chru-lille.fr.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Management of infected abdominal wall defects is a subject of debate, and the use of prosthetic mesh repair is not recommended due to the dramatic rate of mesh infection. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the recurrence rate and long-term outcomes of repairing infected abdominal wall defects using the Strattice porcine acellular dermal matrix reinforcement through a single-stage surgical approach.

METHODS:

From August 2010 to May 2012, consecutive patients treated for infected abdominal wall defects using Strattice, a biologic prosthesis, were enrolled. All data were collected prospectively and all patients were followed for physical examination and CT scan evaluation. The primary outcome measure was the recurrence rate.

RESULTS:

Eighteen patients were enrolled and 14 were evaluable. Of these, eight patients had mesh infections and six had enterocutaneous fistulas. Median follow-up was 13 months (range, 3-22) and median length of hospitalization was 13 days (range, 4-56). The Strattice was placed in the intraperitoneal underlay position in 12 patients, and in the retro-rectus position for two. Post-operative complications included skin dehiscence (n = 3), wound infection (n = 2), skin necrosis (n = 1), and seroma (n = 2). At the end of follow-up, six patients (43 %) experienced abdominal wall defect recurrence.

CONCLUSIONS:

The utility of biologic prostheses to repair infected abdominal wall defects is controversial; however, currently, they remain the only alternative to a two-staged surgery. Prospective, randomized studies in larger populations of patients are necessary to fully determine the usefulness of biologic prostheses in this setting.

PMID:
24048636
[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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