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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014 May;95(5):825-31. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2013.09.001. Epub 2013 Sep 11.

Functional outcomes associated with adaptive seating interventions in children and youth with wheeled mobility needs.

Author information

  • 1Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada; Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Electronic address: sryan@hollandbloorview.ca.
  • 2Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
  • 3Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
  • 4Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
  • 5Shriners Hospitals for Children-Canada, Montreal, QC, Canada.
  • 6Sunny Hill Health Centre for Children, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
  • 7Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada; Lawrence S. Bloomberg, Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the parent-reported functional outcomes associated with adaptive seating devices for wheeled mobility devices used by young people aged 1 to 17 years.

DESIGN:

Longitudinal case series.

SETTING:

Homes of participating parents.

PARTICIPANTS:

Parents (N=70, 63 mothers, 6 fathers, 1 grandmother) who had children with adaptive seating needs.

INTERVENTION:

Adaptive seating system for wheeled mobility devices.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Family Impact of Assistive Technology Scale for Adaptive Seating (FIATS-AS).

RESULTS:

All parents completed the FIATS-AS 4 times-2 times before and 2 times after their child received a new adaptive seating system. Mixed-design analysis of variance did not detect significant mean differences among the FIATS-AS scores measured at baseline and 2 and 8 months after receiving the seating system (F2,134=.22, P=.81). However, the FIATS-AS detected a significant interaction between age cohort and interview time (F4,134=4.5, P<.001, partial η(2)=.16). Post hoc testing confirmed that 8 months after receiving the seating system was associated with a large improvement in child and family functioning for children <4 years, maintenance of functioning for children between 4 and 12 years, and a moderate decline in functioning for youth between 13 and 17 years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Adaptive seating interventions for wheeled mobility devices are associated with functional changes in the lives of children and their families that interact inversely with age. Future controlled longitudinal studies could provide further empirical evidence of functional changes in the lives of children and their families after the introduction and long-term use of specific adaptive seating interventions.

Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Family; Outcome assessment (health care); Rehabilitation; Self-help devices; Wheelchairs

PMID:
24035768
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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