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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014 Jan;133(1):165-71.e1-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2013.07.032. Epub 2013 Sep 10.

Probiotic milk consumption in pregnancy and infancy and subsequent childhood allergic diseases.

Author information

  • 1Department of Food, Water and Cosmetics, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, NC. Electronic address: randi.jacobsen.bertelsen@fhi.no.
  • 2Department of Exposure and Risk Assessment, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
  • 3Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, NC; Department of Chronic Diseases, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
  • 4Department of Genes and Environment, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
  • 5Department of Genes and Environment, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
  • 6Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, NC.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Whether probiotics, which can influence the microbiome, prevent infant eczema or allergic disease remains an open question. Most studies have focused on high-risk infants.

OBJECTIVES:

We sought to assess whether consumption of probiotic milk products protects against atopic eczema, rhinoconjunctivitis, and asthma in early childhood in a large population-based pregnancy cohort (the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study).

METHODS:

We examined associations between consumption of probiotic milk products in pregnancy and infancy with questionnaire-reported atopic eczema, rhinoconjunctivitis, and asthma in 40,614 children. Relative risks (RRs) were calculated by using general linear models adjusted for potential confounders.

RESULTS:

Consumption of probiotic milk in pregnancy was associated with a slightly reduced relative risk (RR) of atopic eczema at 6 months (adjusted RR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.89-0.99) and of rhinoconjunctivitis between 18 and 36 months (adjusted RR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0.98) compared with no consumption during pregnancy. Maternal history of allergic disease did not notably influence the associations. When both the mother (during pregnancy) and infant (after 6 months of age) had consumed probiotic milk, the adjusted RR of rhinoconjunctivitis was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.68-0.93) relative to no consumption by either. Probiotic milk consumption was not associated with asthma at 36 months.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this population-based cohort consumption of probiotic milk products was related to a reduced incidence of atopic eczema and rhinoconjunctivitis, but no association was seen for incidence of asthma by 36 months of age.

Published by Mosby, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

Allergy; BMI; Body mass index; FFQ; Food frequency questionnaire; MJ; Megajoules; MoBa; Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study; RR; Relative risk; asthma; eczema; microbiome; probiotics; rhinoconjunctivitis

PMID:
24034345
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3912862
Free PMC Article
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