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Nat Commun. 2013;4:2434. doi: 10.1038/ncomms3434.

Endogenous fructose production and metabolism in the liver contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome.

Author information

  • 11] Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, University of Colorado, 12700 East 19th Avenue, Room 7015, Denver, Colorado 80045, USA [2].

Erratum in

  • Nat Commun. 2013;4:2929. Ruzicky, Philip [corrected to Ruzycki, Philip].

Abstract

Carbohydrates with high glycaemic index are proposed to promote the development of obesity, insulin resistance and fatty liver, but the mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. High serum glucose concentrations are known to induce the polyol pathway and increase fructose generation in the liver. Here we show that this hepatic, endogenously produced fructose causes systemic metabolic changes. We demonstrate that mice unable to metabolize fructose are protected from an increase in energy intake and body weight, visceral obesity, fatty liver, elevated insulin levels and hyperleptinaemia after exposure to 10% glucose for 14 weeks. In normal mice, glucose consumption is accompanied by aldose reductase and polyol pathway activation in steatotic areas. In this regard, we show that aldose reductase-deficient mice are protected against glucose-induced fatty liver. We conclude that endogenous fructose generation and metabolism in the liver represents an important mechanism by which glucose promotes the development of metabolic syndrome.

PMID:
24022321
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3833672
Free PMC Article
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