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Br J Radiol. 2013 Oct;86(1030):20130439. doi: 10.1259/bjr.20130439.

Single institutional experience of the treatment of angiosarcoma of the face and scalp.

Author information

  • 1Department of Radiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. yoshitakamiki@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Angiosarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm with a poor prognosis. A retrospective study was performed to accumulate radiotherapy (RT) data.

METHODS:

Data from 17 patients with angiosarcoma of the face and scalp (AFS) who were treated with definitive RT between January 1999 and July 2011 were retrospectively analysed. The total radiation dose was 70 Gy, and the fractional doses were 2.0-2.5 Gy. Combined with RT, chemotherapy using docetaxel alone, recombinant interleukin-2 immunotherapy alone and both of these was performed in 10, 4 and 2 patients, respectively. Three patients underwent limited surgery before RT.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 82%, and the median overall survival (OS) rate was 26 months. Locoregional relapse alone, distant metastasis alone and both of these were confirmed in 4, 5 and 4 patients, respectively. Patients treated with docetaxel showed a better prognosis (p=0.0477), a distant metastasis-free rate (p=0.0063) and a better in-field control rate, although the last was not statistically significant (p=0.1645).

CONCLUSION:

Definitive RT combined with docetaxel chemotherapy provided an effective approach for treating AFS.

ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE:

Since patients treated with chemoradiotherpy using docetaxel showed better OS and distant metastasis-free rates than those who did not receive docetaxel, it was warranted to continue use of docetaxel. In chemoradiotherapy at a dose of 70 Gy using docetaxel, 2-year in-field control rate was 67%.

PMID:
24014066
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3798340
[Available on 2014/10/1]
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