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Respir Med. 2014 Jan;108(1):144-52. doi: 10.1016/j.rmed.2013.08.005. Epub 2013 Sep 5.

The host immune response contributes to Haemophilus influenzae virulence.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medical Microbiology, NUTRIM, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: T.Geelen@maastrichtuniversity.nl.
  • 2Department of Medical Microbiology, NUTRIM, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: Giel.Gaajetaan@maastrichtuniversity.nl.
  • 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, NUTRIM, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Program Development Centre, CIRO+, Horn, The Netherlands. Electronic address: e.wouters@mumc.nl.
  • 4Department of Respiratory Medicine, NUTRIM, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: g.rohde@mumc.nl.
  • 5Program Development Centre, CIRO+, Horn, The Netherlands. Electronic address: fritsfranssen@ciro-horn.nl.
  • 6Department of Medical Microbiology, NUTRIM, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: g.grauls@maastrichtuniversity.nl.
  • 7Department of Medical Microbiology, NUTRIM, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: e.stobberingh@gmail.com.
  • 8Department of Medical Microbiology, NUTRIM, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: bruggeman@stintelaar.be.
  • 9Department of Medical Microbiology, NUTRIM, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: f.stassen@maastrichtuniversity.nl.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is compelling evidence that infections with non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) are associated with exacerbations in COPD patients. However, NTHi has also been isolated frequently during clinically stable disease. In this study we tested the hypothesis that genetically distinct NTHi isolates obtained from COPD patients differ in virulence which could account for dissimilarities in the final outcome of an infection (stable vs. exacerbation).

RESULTS:

NTHi isolates (n = 32) were obtained from stable COPD patients, or during exacerbations. Genetically divergent NTHi isolates were selected and induction of inflammation was assessed as an indicator of virulence using different in vitro models. Despite marked genomic differences among NTHi isolates, in vitro studies could not distinguish between NTHi isolates based on their inflammatory capacities. Alternatively, when using a whole blood assay results demonstrated marked inter-, but not intra-individual differences in cytokine release between healthy volunteers irrespective of the origin of the NTHi isolate used.

CONCLUSION:

Results suggest that the individual immune reactivity might be an important predictor for the clinical outcome (exacerbation vs. no exacerbation) following NTHi infection.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; Exacerbations; Inflammatory response; Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

PMID:
24011804
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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