Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Health Promot Int. 2015 Sep;30(3):438-48. doi: 10.1093/heapro/dat058. Epub 2013 Aug 28.

The impact of patient narratives on self-efficacy and self-care in Australians with type 2 diabetes: stage 1 results of a randomized trial.

Author information

  • 1Melbourne School of Population Health, Centre for Health Policy, Programs and Economics, The University of Melbourne, Level 4, 207 Bouverie Street, Melbourne, VIC, Australia c.campbell6@student.unimelb.edu.au.
  • 2Melbourne School of Population Health, Centre for Health Policy, Programs and Economics, The University of Melbourne, Level 4, 207 Bouverie Street, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
  • 3School of Social and Political Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC Australia.
  • 4Statistical Consulting Centre, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Abstract

A randomized-controlled trial (RCT) was conducted from September 2009 to June 2011. National Diabetes Services Scheme registrants diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and aged 30-70 years were invited to participate in a 3-week intervention programme with follow-up at 4 weeks and 6 months. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires in the participant's homes. The intervention group received diabetes factsheets and a DVD comprising patient stories (narratives) of type 2 diabetes management. The control group (CG) received factsheets only. The RCT evaluated the impact of patient narratives on the study outcomes, self-efficacy and self-care, using the Aust/English Diabetes Management Self-efficacy Scale and the Summary Diabetes Self-care Activities measure. Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or CG using block randomization. The study was not blinded. Six hundred and seventy people enrolled into the study with 335 allocated to each group. At 4 weeks, data were available for 598 participants. t-tests were used to analyse the results. The mean difference between the groups for self-efficacy was 7.2 units (P < 0.001, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 3.8, 10.7) favouring the intervention group. Change in self-care behaviours during the previous 7 days was also significantly greater for the intervention group: general diet (0.31 days, 95% CI 0.13, 0.48), specific diet (0.26 days, 95% CI 0.05, 0.46), exercise (0.51 days, 95% CI 0.23, 0.80), blood glucose (0.52 days, 95% CI 0.19, 0.85) and foot care (0.38 days, 95% CI 0.06, 0.71). Narrative communication shows promise as a valuable component of type 2 diabetes self-management programmes.

REGISTRATION:

ACTRN 12609000210279.

© The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

KEYWORDS:

narrative communication; self-efficacy; self-management; type 2 diabetes

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk