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Psychiatry Res. 2013 Dec 30;210(3):1245-59. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2013.07.032. Epub 2013 Aug 24.

The development of delusion revisited: a transdiagnostic framework.

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  • 1Department of Mental Health and Pathological Addiction, AUSL of Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy. Electronic address: Michele.Poletti2@ausl.re.it.

Abstract

This study proposes a transdiagnostic framework for delusion development, analysing psychiatric (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder) and neurological disorders (stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases) in which delusions are predominant. Our aim is to identify a transdiagnostic core of neural and cognitive alterations associated with delusions across distinct clinical disorders. Reviewed empirical evidence suggests delusions are associated: on the neural level with changes in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) networks, and on the neuropsychological level with dysfunction in the processes (generation of affective value, the construction of internal models of the world, and the reflection about Self and/or Other's mental states) that these network mediate. The concurrent aberration of all these processes could be critical for the clinical transition to a psychotic delusional state. In particular, delusions could become clinically manifest when (1) stimuli are attributed an aberrant affective salience, that (2) is explained by the patient within distorted explanatory internal models that (3) are poorly inhibited by cognitive control systems. This framework extends the two-factor account of delusion model and suggests that common neural mechanisms for the delusions in psychiatric and in neurological disorders.

© 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Default mode network; Delusion; Dementia; Dopamine; Psychosis; Salience; Ventromedial prefrontal cortex

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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