Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Meat Sci. 2014 Jul;97(3):310-5. doi: 10.1016/j.meatsci.2013.07.029. Epub 2013 Aug 2.

Relationships between sensory evaluations of beef tenderness, shear force measurements and consumer characteristics.

Author information

  • 1Department of Agricultural Economics, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: Lynn.VanWezemael@UGent.be.
  • 2Laboratory for Animal Nutrition and Animal Product Quality, Department of Animal Production, Ghent University, Proefhoevestraat 10, B-9090 Melle, Belgium. Electronic address: Stefaan.DeSmet@UGent.be.
  • 3Nofima, Osloveien 1, NO-1430 Ås, Norway. Electronic address: Oydis.Ueland@nofima.no.
  • 4Department of Agricultural Economics, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: Wim.Verbeke@UGent.be.

Abstract

The supply of tender beef is an important challenge for the beef industry. Knowledge about the profile of consumers who are more optimistic or more accurate in their tenderness evaluations is important for product development and beef marketing purposes. Central location tests of beef steaks were performed in Norway and Belgium (n=218). Instrumental and sensorial tenderness of three muscles from Belgian Blue and Norwegian Red cattle was reported. Consumers who are optimistically evaluating tenderness were found to be more often male, less food neophobic, more positive towards beef healthiness, and showed fewer concerns about beef safety. No clear profile emerged for consumers who assessed tenderness similar to shear force measurements, which suggests that tenderness is mainly evaluated subjectively. The results imply a window of opportunities in tenderness improvements, and allow targeting a market segment which is less critical towards beef tenderness.

© 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Beef; Consumer; Sensory; Shear force; Tenderness

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk