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Br J Cancer. 2013 Sep 17;109(6):1562-9. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2013.456. Epub 2013 Aug 13.

Acute tumour response to the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib (AZD6244, ARRY-142886) evaluated by non-invasive diffusion-weighted MRI.

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  • 1Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Non-invasive imaging biomarkers underpin the development of molecularly targeted anti-cancer drugs. This study evaluates tumour apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), measured by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI), as a biomarker of response to the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib (AZD6244, ARRY-142886) in human tumour xenografts.

METHODS:

Nude mice bearing human BRAF(V600D) WM266.4 melanoma or BRAF(V600E) Colo205 colon carcinoma xenografts were treated for 4 days with vehicle or selumetinib. DW-MRI was performed before and 2 h after the last dose and excised tumours analysed for levels of phospho-ERK1/2, cleaved caspase 3 (CC3) and necrosis.

RESULTS:

Selumetinib treatment induced tumour stasis and reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in both WM266.4 and Colo205 tumour xenografts. Relative to day 0, mean tumour ADC was unchanged in the control groups but was significantly increased by up to 1.6-fold in selumetinib-treated WM266.4 and Colo205 tumours. Histological analysis revealed a significant increase in necrosis in selumetinib-treated WM266.4 and Colo205 xenografts and CC3 staining in selumetinib-treated Colo205 tumours relative to controls.

CONCLUSION:

Changes in ADC following treatment with the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib in responsive human tumour xenografts were concomitant with induction of tumour cell death. ADC may provide a useful non-invasive pharmacodynamic biomarker for early clinical assessment of response to selumetinib and other MEK-ERK1/2 signalling-targeted therapies.

PMID:
23942066
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3776979
[Available on 2014/9/17]
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