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PLoS One. 2013 Aug 6;8(8):e70213. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0070213. Print 2013.

Separate and joint associations of occupational and leisure-time sitting with cardio-metabolic risk factors in working adults: a cross-sectional study.

Author information

  • 1Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. madina.saidj@regionh.dk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The workplace is a main setting for prolonged sitting for some occupational groups. Convincing evidence has recently accumulated on the detrimental cardio-metabolic health effects of leisure-time sitting. Yet, much less is known about occupational sitting, and the potential health risk attached compared to leisure-time sitting.

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the separate and joint associations of occupational and leisure-time sitting with cardio-metabolic risk factors in working adults.

METHODS:

All working adults (N = 2544) from the Health2006, a Danish population-based study, were included in this cross-sectional study. Participants reported hours of sitting during work, during leisure-time along with socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics, including physical activity. Cardio-metabolic risk factors (waist circumference, body mass index, body fat percentage, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, hemoglobin A1c and plasma glucose) were measured. Associations were explored by linear regression for leisure-time, occupational, and overall sitting time.

RESULTS:

Statistically significant (p<.05) detrimental associations of leisure-time sitting were observed with all cardio-metabolic risk factors, except hemoglobin A1c and plasma glucose. Similarly, occupational sitting time was significantly detrimentally associated with HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and insulin. For categories of sitting time, a joint adverse association of sitting much during both work-time and leisure-time was observed.

CONCLUSION:

The associations of occupational sitting time with cardio-metabolic risk factors were fewer and weaker compared to leisure-time sitting. Yet, the joint associations of occupational and leisure-time sitting with cardio-metabolic risk factors were higher than the separate. Our findings amplify the need for further focus in this area prior to making assumptions about equivalent health risks across sedentary behaviors. To our knowledge, this is the first study to contrast the deleterious associations of prolonged occupational and leisure-time sitting, both separately and jointly.

PMID:
23936391
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3735561
Free PMC Article
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