Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Phlebology. 2014 Oct;29(9):570-9. doi: 10.1177/0268355513494375. Epub 2013 Aug 8.

A systematic review of circulating markers in primary chronic venous insufficiency.

Author information

  • 1Vascular Biology Unit, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia.
  • 2Vascular Biology Unit, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, The Townsville Hospital, Townsville, Queensland, Australia jonathan.golledge@jcu.edu.au.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The etiology of primary chronic venous insufficiency is poorly understood. This systematic review aimed to summarize published evidence assessing the association of circulating markers with primary chronic venous insufficiency.

METHODS:

A search was undertaken through the PubMed database using the terms "venous insufficiency" and "biological marker" or "plasma" or "serum". Search limits included English language, human subjects and studies with publication dates from 1994. Studies which classified patients using the Clinical-Etiology-Anatomy-Pathophysiology system of venous disease were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Seventeen studies were included, which have examined > 60 different biomarkers. A total of 13 markers were assessed in >1 study with the number of primary chronic venous insufficiency cases ranging from 41 to 244 and the number of controls ranging from 30 to 144 in these studies. Circulating estradiol, homocysteine and vascular endothelial growth factor were the most consistently associated with primary chronic venous insufficiency.

CONCLUSIONS:

Whilst a number of studies have examined biomarkers associated with primary chronic venous insufficiency, further studies are required using improved and standardized approaches on larger populations. Biomarker research may increase pathogenic knowledge and result in opportunities to decrease chronic venous insufficiency burden.

© The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

KEYWORDS:

Venous insufficiency; biological markers; blood; plasma; serum

PMID:
23928282
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk