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Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Jun;142(6):1245-58. doi: 10.1017/S0950268813001866. Epub 2013 Aug 8.

Simulations to compare efficacies of tetravalent dengue vaccines and mosquito vector control.

Author information

  • 1National Institute of Health, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand.
  • 2Onoda Hospital, Haramachi-ku, Minami-soma city, Fukushima, Japan.

Abstract

SUMMARY:

Infection with dengue, the most prevalent mosquito-borne virus, manifests as dengue fever (DF) or the more fatal dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). DHF occurs mainly when an individual who has acquired antibodies to one serotype is inoculated with another serotype. It was reported that mosquito control may have increased the incidence of DF and DHF due to age-dependency in manifesting these illnesses or an immunological mechanism. Tetravalent dengue vaccine is currently being tested in clinical trials. However, seroconversions to all four serotypes were achieved only after three doses. Therefore, vaccines may predispose vaccinees to the risk of developing DHF in future infections. This study employed an individual-based computer simulation, to emulate mosquito control and vaccination, incorporating seroconversion rates reported from actual clinical trials. It was found that mosquito control alone would have increased incidence of DF and DHF in areas of high mosquito density. A vaccination programme with very high coverage, even with a vaccine of suboptimal seroconversion rates, attenuated possible surges in the incidence of DF and DHF which would have been caused by insufficient reduction in mosquito abundance. DHF cases attributable to vaccine-derived enhancement were fewer than DHF cases prevented by a vaccine with considerably high (although not perfect) seroconversion rates. These predictions may justify vaccination programmes, at least in areas of high mosquito abundance. In such areas, mosquito control programmes should be conducted only after the vaccination programme with a high coverage has been initiated.

PMID:
23925059
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4045171
Free PMC Article
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