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PLoS One. 2013 Jul 29;8(7):e70168. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0070168. Print 2013.

The anaphase-promoting complex protein 5 (AnapC5) associates with A20 and inhibits IL-17-mediated signal transduction.

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  • 1Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.

Abstract

IL-17 is the founding member of a family of cytokines and receptors with unique structures and signaling properties. IL-17 is the signature cytokine of Th17 cells, a relatively new T cell population that promotes inflammation in settings of infection and autoimmunity. Despite advances in understanding Th17 cells, mechanisms of IL-17-mediated signal transduction are less well defined. IL-17 signaling requires contributions from two receptor subunits, IL-17RA and IL-17RC. Mutants of IL-17RC lacking the cytoplasmic domain are nonfunctional, indicating that IL-17RC provides essential but poorly understood signaling contributions to IL-17-mediated signaling. To better understand the role of IL-17RC in signaling, we performed a yeast 2-hybrid screen to identify novel proteins associated with the IL-17RC cytoplasmic tail. One of the most frequent candidates was the anaphase promoting complex protein 7 (APC7 or AnapC7), which interacted with both IL-17RC and IL-17RA. Knockdown of AnapC7 by siRNA silencing exerted no detectable impact on IL-17 signaling. However, AnapC5, which associates with AnapC7, was also able to bind IL-17RA and IL-17RC. Moreover, AnapC5 silencing enhanced IL-17-induced gene expression, suggesting an inhibitory activity. Strikingly, AnapC5 also associated with A20 (TNFAIP3), a recently-identified negative feedback regulator of IL-17 signal transduction. IL-17 signaling was not impacted by knockdown of Itch or TAXBP1, scaffolding proteins that mediate A20 inhibition in the TNFα and IL-1 signaling pathways. These data suggest a model in which AnapC5, rather than TAX1BP1 and Itch, is a novel adaptor and negative regulator of IL-17 signaling pathways.

PMID:
23922952
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3726431
Free PMC Article
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