Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Neurology. 2013 Sep 3;81(10):888-95. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182a351d4. Epub 2013 Aug 2.

Antihypertensive medication use and risk of cognitive impairment: the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study.

Author information

  • 1VA Pacific Islands Health Care System, University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, HI, USA. rebecca.gelber@va.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the associations between classes of antihypertensive medication use and the risk of cognitive impairment among elderly hypertensive men.

METHODS:

The Honolulu-Asia Aging Study is a prospective, community-based cohort study of Japanese American men conducted in Honolulu, Hawaii. We examined 2,197 participants (mean age 77 years at cohort entry, 1991-1993, followed through September 2010) with hypertension and without dementia or cognitive impairment at baseline, who provided information on medication use. Cognitive function was assessed at 7 standardized examinations using the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI). Cognitive impairment was defined as a CASI score <74.

RESULTS:

A total of 854 men developed cognitive impairment (median follow-up, 5.8 years). β-Blocker use as the sole antihypertensive drug at baseline was consistently associated with a lower risk of cognitive impairment (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50-0.94), as compared with men not taking any antihypertensive medications, adjusting for multiple potential confounders. The use of diuretics, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, or vasodilators alone was not significantly associated with cognitive impairment. Results were similar excluding those with cardiovascular disease or <1 year of follow-up, and additionally adjusting for pulse pressure, heart rate, baseline and midlife systolic blood pressure, and midlife antihypertensive treatment (IRR 0.65; 95% CI 0.45-0.94). The association between β-blocker use and cognitive impairment was stronger among men with diabetes, men aged >75 years, and those with pulse pressure ≥70 mm Hg.

CONCLUSIONS:

β-blocker use is associated with a lower risk of developing cognitive impairment in elderly Japanese American men.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk