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Environ Pollut. 2013 Nov;182:63-9. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2013.07.005. Epub 2013 Jul 27.

Placental IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 expression correlate with umbilical cord blood PAH and PBDE levels from prenatal exposure to electronic waste.

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  • 1Analytical Cytology Laboratory, Shantou University Medical College, 22 Xinling Rd., Shantou 515041, Guangdong, China; Provincial Key Laboratory of Infectious Diseases and Molecular Immunopathology, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, China; Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, China.

Abstract

Electronic waste recycling produces Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) which may affect fetal growth and development by altering the insulin-like-growth factor (IGF) system. Questionnaires were administered to pregnant women (Guiyu, an e-waste site, n = 101; control, n = 53), and umbilical cord blood (UCB) and placentas were collected upon delivery. PBDEs and PAHs in UCB and placental IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 mRNA levels were analyzed using GC-MS and real-time PCR, respectively. Infant birth length and Apgar scores were lower in Guiyu. All PAHs (except Fl, Chr, IP, BbF and BP), total 16-PAHs, total/individual PBDEs, placental IGF-1 (median 0.23 vs 0.19; P < 0.05) and IGFBP-3 (median 1.91 vs 0.68; P < 0.001) levels were significantly higher in Guiyu. Spearman correlation showed that BDE-154, BDE-209 and ∑5ring-PAHs positively correlate with IGF-1 while PBDEs, 4 rings and total PAHs correlate with IGFBP-3 expression. Increased placental IGF-1 level might indirectly affect fetal growth and development.

Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

KEYWORDS:

E-waste; Fetus; Gestation; Growth; Prenatal

PMID:
23900036
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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