Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nanomedicine. 2014 Jan;10(1):89-98. doi: 10.1016/j.nano.2013.07.004. Epub 2013 Jul 24.

The in vivo underlying mechanism for recovery response formation in nano-titanium dioxide exposed Caenorhabditis elegans after transfer to the normal condition.

Author information

  • 1Key Laboratory of Environmental Medicine Engineering in Ministry of Education, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, China.
  • 2School of Public Health, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, China.
  • 3Key Laboratory of Environmental Medicine Engineering in Ministry of Education, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009, China. Electronic address: dayongw@seu.edu.cn.

Abstract

So far, we still know little about mechanism for recovery response of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Here we used Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate recovery responses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) exposed animals and the underlying mechanism. After acute exposure to TiO2-NPs (100mg/L), endpoints including defecation and permeable state of intestinal barrier of exposed nematodes returned to control levels; however, after prolonged exposure to TiO2-NPs (100μg/L), endpoints of exposed nematodes could not be recovered to control levels under the normal condition. After prolonged exposure to TiO2-NPs, nematodes exhibited severe deficits in development of intestinal barrier and AVL and DVB neurons controlling defecation; however, after acute exposure to TiO2-NPs, nematodes had normal developmental state of intestinal barrier and AVL and DVB neurons. Our results imply that developmental states of intestinal barrier and AVL and DVB neurons may serve as a pivotal determinant for recovery response in TiO2-NPs exposed nematodes.

FROM THE CLINICAL EDITOR:

This basic science study investigates the recovery response to TiO2 nanoparticles in a nematode model, and concludes that developmental states of the intestinal barrier and AVL and DVB neurons likely serve as determinants for recovery following TiO2-NP exposure.

© 2014.

KEYWORDS:

Caenorhabditis elegans; Defecation; Intestinal barrier; Recovery response; TiO(2)-NPs

PMID:
23891985
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk