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Br J Psychiatry. 2014 Mar;204(3):188-93. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.112.119610. Epub 2013 Jul 25.

Risk of dementia after anaesthesia and surgery.

Author information

  • 1Pin-Liang Chen, MS, Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei; Chih-Wen Yang, MD, Department of Neurology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Su-Ao and Yuanshan Branch, and National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei; Yi-Kuan Tseng, PhD, Graduate Institute of Statistics, National Central University, Jhongli; Wei-Zen Sun, MD, PhD, Department of Anaesthesiology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Jane-Ling Wang, PhD, Department of Statistics, University of California, Davis, California, USA; Shuu-Jiun Wang, MD, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, and Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei; Yen-Jen Oyang, PhD, Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Taiwan University, and Graduate Institutes of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei; Jong-Ling Fuh, MD, Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, and National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The potential relationship between anaesthesia, surgery and onset of dementia remains elusive.

AIMS:

To determine whether the risk of dementia increases after surgery with anaesthesia, and to evaluate possible associations among age, mode of anaesthesia, type of surgery and risk of dementia.

METHOD:

The study cohort comprised patients aged 50 years and older who were anaesthetised for the first time since 1995 between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2007, and a control group of randomly selected patients matched for age and gender. Patients were followed until 31 December 2010 to identify the emergence of dementia.

RESULTS:

Relative to the control group, patients who underwent anaesthesia and surgery exhibited an increased risk of dementia (hazard ratio = 1.99) and a reduced mean interval to dementia diagnosis. The risk of dementia increased in patients who received intravenous or intramuscular anaesthesia, regional anaesthesia and general anaesthesia.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of our nationwide, population-based study suggest that patients who undergo anaesthesia and surgery may be at increased risk of dementia.

PMID:
23887997
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3939441
Free PMC Article
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