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J Breast Cancer. 2013 Jun;16(2):171-7. doi: 10.4048/jbc.2013.16.2.171. Epub 2013 Jun 28.

Sunlight exposure and breast density: a population-based study.

Author information

  • 1School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. ; Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Institute of Medicine and public Health, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study aims to assess the association of sunlight exposure with breast cancer risk, measured by the breast density assessed from Tabár's mammographic pattern in Chinese women.

METHODS:

A total of 676 premenopausal women were recruited to participate in this study, in which 650 completed a validated sunlight exposure questionnaire via telephone. The mammograms were classified according to Tabár's classification for parenchyma, and patterns IV & V and I, II & III indicated respectively high and low risk mammographic patterns for breast cancer. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for sun exposure-related variables were estimated using unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders.

RESULTS:

Among 646 participants, women with high breast cancer risk (Tabár's patterns IV &V) had less hours spent in the sun than those with low risk (I, II & III) at any age stage. A higher level of sunlight exposure was associated with a significantly lower risk having high risk Tabár's pattern. Women aged 40 to 44 years who were in the highest tertile of lifetime total hours spent in the sun had a multi-adjusted OR of 0.41 (95% CI, 0.18-0.92; p for trend=0.03) compared with those in the lowest tertile (>2.19 hr/day vs. <1.32 hr/day). For hours spent in the sun across the ages of 6 to 12 years, the comparable OR was 0.37 (95% CI, 0.15-0.91; p for trend=0.03).

CONCLUSION:

These findings suggest that higher sunlight exposure is related to a lower risk of having high risk breast density pattern in premenopausal women. Our results also suggest the most relevant period of exposure is during earlier life.

KEYWORDS:

Breast neoplasms; Mammographic density; Sunlight; Vitamin D

PMID:
23843849
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3706862
Free PMC Article

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