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Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Nov;65(11):1844-52.

Effect of cardiovascular training on fitness and perceived disease activity in people with ankylosing spondylitis.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Several studies suggest that patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a 12-week, individually monitored, with moderate heart rate level intensity cardiovascular training on cardiovascular fitness and perceived disease activity in AS patients.

METHODS:

Patients diagnosed with AS according to the modified New York criteria were randomized to either cardiovascular training or attention control. The training group performed 3 cardiovascular training units per week. All participants attended 1 weekly usual care flexibility training session. Attention control contained regular discussion groups on coping strategies. Adherence was self-monitored. Assessments were performed at baseline and after the intervention period of 3 months. Physical fitness was the primary end point, measured in watts using a submaximal bicycle test following the physical work capacity 75% protocol. All analyses controlled for sex, age, body mass index,baseline fitness and physical activity levels, and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI).

RESULTS:

Of 106 AS patients enrolled, 40% were women and the mean ± SD age was 49 ± 12 years. A total of 74.6% of the training group reported exercising at least 3 times a week. At the 3-month followup, the fitness level in the training group was significantly higher than in the control group (mean ± SE 90.32W ± 4.52W versus 109.84W ± 4.72W; P = 0.001), independent of other covariates. The mean BASDAI total score was 0.31 points lower (P = 0.31) in the training group, reaching significance for the peripheral pain subscore (1.19; P = 0.01) but not for back pain or fatigue.

CONCLUSION:

Cardiovascular training, in addition to flexibility exercise, increased fitness in AS patients and reduced their peripheral pain.

PMID:
23836515
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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