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Personal Disord. 2014 Oct;5(4):422-7. doi: 10.1037/per0000023. Epub 2013 Jul 8.

Narcissistic personality disorder in DSM-5.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Arizona College of Medicine.
  • 2Department of Psychology, Texas A&M University.

Abstract

The criteria for personality disorders in Section II of DSM-5 have not changed from those in DSM-IV. Therefore, the diagnosis of Section II narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) will perpetuate all of the well-enumerated shortcomings associated with the diagnosis since DSM-III. In this article, we will briefly review problems associated with Section II NPD and then discuss the evolution of a new model of personality disorder and the place in the model of pathological narcissism and NPD. The new model was intended to be the official approach to the diagnosis of personality pathology in DSM-5, but was ultimately placed as an alternative in Section III for further study. The new model is a categorical-dimensional hybrid based on the assessment of core elements of personality functioning and of pathological personality traits. The specific criteria for NPD were intended to rectify some of the shortcomings of the DSM-IV representation by acknowledging both grandiose and vulnerable aspects, overt and covert presentations, and the dimensionality of narcissism. In addition, criteria were assigned and diagnostic thresholds set based on empirical data. The Section III representation of narcissistic phenomena using dimensions of self and interpersonal functioning and relevant traits offers a significant improvement over Section II NPD.

(PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

PMID:
23834518
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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