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Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2014 Jan;24(1):50-6. doi: 10.1016/j.numecd.2013.04.015. Epub 2013 Jun 19.

Plasma adiponectin in heart failure with and without cachexia: catabolic signal linking catabolism, symptomatic status, and prognosis.

Author information

  • 1Applied Cachexia Research, Department of Cardiology, Charite Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.
  • 2Centre for Stroke Research Berlin, Charite Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.
  • 3Division of Cardiology, University Clinic, Golnik, Slovenia.
  • 4Department of Heart Diseases, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland.
  • 5Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutritional Medicine, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.
  • 6Centre for Clinical and Basic Research, IRCCS San Raffaele, Rome, Italy.
  • 7Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine & the Medical Research Laboratories, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
  • 8Applied Cachexia Research, Department of Cardiology, Charite Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany; Centre for Stroke Research Berlin, Charite Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: wolfram.doehner@charite.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Adiponectin (ADPN) as an adipose tissue hormone contributes to regulation of energy metabolism and body composition and is associated with cardiovascular risk profile parameters. Cardiac cachexia may develop as a result of severe catabolic derangement in chronic heart failure (CHF). We aimed to determinate an abnormal ADPN regulation as a link between catabolic signalling, symptomatic deterioration and poor prognosis.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We measured plasma ADPN in 111 CHF patients (age 65 ± 11, 90% male, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 36 ± 11%, peak oxygen consumption (peakVO2) 18.1 ± 5.7 l/kg*min, body mass index (BMI) 27 ± 4 kg/m(2), all mean ± standard deviation) and 36 healthy controls of similar age and BMI. Body composition was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, insulin sensitivity was evaluated by homoeostasis model assessment, exercise capacity by spiroergometry. Plasma ADPN did not differ between CHF vs. controls (13.5 ± 11.0 vs. 10.5 ± 5.3 mg/l, p > 0.4), but increased stepwise with NYHA functional class (I/II/III: 5.7 ± 1.4/10.7 ± 8.3/19.2 ± 14.0 mg/l, ANOVA p < 0.01). Furthermore, ADPN correlated with VO2 at anaerobic threshold (r = -0.34, p < 0.05). ADPN was highest in cachectic patients (cCHF, 16%) vs. non-cachectic (ncCHF) (18.7 ± 15.0 vs. 12.5 ± 9.9 mg/l; p < 0.05). ADPN indicated mortality risk independently of established prognosticators (HR: 1.04 95% CI: 1.02-1.07; p < 0.0001). ADPN above the mean (13.5 mg/l) was associated with a 3.4 times higher mortality risk in CHF vs. patients with ADPN levels below the mean.

CONCLUSION:

Circulating ADPN is abnormally regulated in CHF. ADPN may be involved in impaired metabolic signalling linking disease progression, tissue wasting, and poor outcome in CHF.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Adiponectin; Cachexia; Chronic heart failure; Metabolism

PMID:
23791298
[PubMed - in process]
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