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Malays J Med Sci. 2012 Oct;19(4):37-49.

Nutrition Quality of Life among Female-Majority Malay Undergraduate Students of Health Sciences.

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  • 1Centre for Clinical and Quality of Life Studies (CCQoLS), Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA), Kampus Kota, Jalan Sultan Mahmud, 20400 Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

University students generally tend to engage in problematic eating behaviours, including unhealthy dieting, skipping meals, and high intake of fast food, although they are aware of the negative consequences. Eating behaviours have been shown to be interestingly related to quality of life (QoL). Our study aimed to 1) assess general nutrition quality of life (NQoL) status and 2) compare NQoL status based on gender, financial resources, study courses, year of study, and body mass index (BMI) profiles.

METHODS:

This study was conducted among undergraduates of health sciences in a local public university in Terengganu. Students completed the Malay version of NQoL (6 domains; 50 items; Likert-type responses 1-5). Data analysis was carried out by using SPSS 16.0, utilising descriptive and parametric statistics.

RESULTS:

A total of 241 students were enrolled [age = 19.7 (0.1) years; female (83.0%); Malay (96.7%)]. Social/Interpersonal Factors [3.84 (0.43)] emerged as the best component, while Food Impact [3.10 (0.40)] was the worst. Across all variables, only gender and study courses showed significantly different NQoL. Females scored better than males in Self-Efficacy (confidence in food selection ability) (P < 0.05). Nursing students also experienced significantly greater NQoL (mean = 3.58, 95% CI = 3.47, 3.68) than radiography students in Self-Efficacy (p < 0.05). Medical laboratory technology students had a significantly more favourable NQoL rating (mean = 3.62, 95% CI = 3.47, 3.76) than nursing students in Self-Image (p < 0.05). Study courses significantly influenced the NQoL status of students with Good NQoL, while those with Poor NQoL were mostly influenced by gender and financial resources (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

These outcomes indicate that specific demographic characteristics seemed to make a difference in the NQoL of undergraduate students.

KEYWORDS:

health sciences; nutrition; quality of life; undergraduates

PMID:
23785251
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3684233
Free PMC Article

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