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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2013 Sep 1;188(5):561-6. doi: 10.1164/rccm.201212-2299OC.

The association of adiponectin with computed tomography phenotypes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disorder associated with systemic manifestations that contribute to its morbidity and mortality. Recent work suggests that biomarker signatures in the blood may be useful in evaluating COPD phenotypes and may provide insight into the pathophysiology of systemic manifestations. Adiponectin, primarily produced by fat cells, has been implicated in the pathophysiology of emphysema.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the association of adiponectin with clinical and radiologic COPD phenotypes.

METHODS:

Adiponectin levels were determined in 633 individuals, including 432 individuals with COPD from a cohort of former or current smokers enrolled in the COPDGene study. Univariate and multiple regression analysis were used to examine the association of adiponectin with clinical and physiologic data together with quantitative high-resolution computed tomography parameters.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Multiple regression analysis confirmed that higher plasma adiponectin levels were independently associated with emphysema, decreasing body mass index, female sex, older age, and lower percentage change in prebronchodilator/post-bronchodilator FEV1.

CONCLUSIONS:

The association between plasma adiponectin and computed tomography-assessed emphysema suggests a contribution of adiponectin to the development of emphysema and highlights a role for metabolic derangements in the pathophysiology of emphysema.

PMID:
23777323
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3827701
Free PMC Article
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