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Ann Burns Fire Disasters. 2012 Dec 31;25(4):207-13.

Development of a cost-effective method for platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparation for topical wound healing.

Author information

  • 1Service of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Musculoskeletal Medicine, University Hospital of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Abstract

in English, French

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a volume of plasma fraction of autologous blood having platelet concentrations above baseline whole-blood values due to processing and concentration. PRP is used in various surgical fields to enhance soft-tissue and bone healing by delivering supra-physiological concentrations of autologous platelets at the site of tissue damage. These preparations may provide a good cellular source of various growth factors and cytokines, and modulate tissue response to injury. Common clinically available materials for blood preparations combined with a two-step centrifugation protocol at 280g each, to ensure cellular component integrity, provided platelet preparations which were concentrated 2-3 fold over total blood values. Costs were shown to be lower than those of other methods which require specific equipment and high-cost disposables, while safety and traceability can be increased. PRP can be used for the treatment of wounds of all types including burns and also of split-thickness skin graft donor sites, which are frequently used in burn management. The procedure can be standardized and is easy to adapt in clinical settings with minimal infrastructure, thus enabling large numbers of patients to benefit from a form of cellular therapy.

KEYWORDS:

PRP; cell therapy; health economics; platelets; tissue repair

PMID:
23766756
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3664531
Free PMC Article

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