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Monoclon Antib Immunodiagn Immunother. 2013 Jun;32(3):200-4. doi: 10.1089/mab.2012.0096.

Monoclonal antibodies against tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and its isolated cytokine-like domain.

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  • 1Department of Protein Engineering and Bioinformatics, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine. kondratyuk_yulya@ukr.net

Abstract

Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) is one of the key enzymes of protein biosynthesis. In addition to its basic role, this enzyme reveals some important non-canonical functions. Under apoptotic conditions, the full-length enzyme splits into two fragments having distinct cytokine activities, thereby linking protein synthesis to cytokine signaling pathways. The NH2-terminal catalytic fragment, known as miniTyrRS, binds strongly to the CXC-chemokine receptor CXCR1 and, like interleukin 8, functions as a chemoattractant for polymorphonuclear leukocytes. On the other hand, an extra COOH-terminal domain of human TyrRS has cytokine activities like those of a mature human endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide II (EMAP II). Moreover, the etiology of specific diseases (cancer, neuronal pathologies, autoimmune disorders, and disrupted metabolic conditions) is connected to specific aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Here we report the generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific to N- and C-terminal domains of TyrRS. Recombinant TyrRS and its N- and C-terminal domains were expressed as His-tag fusion proteins in bacteria. Affinity purified proteins have been used as antigens for immunization and hybridoma cell screening. Monoclonal antibodies specific to catalytic N-terminal module and C-terminal EMAP II-like domain of TyrRS may be useful as tools in various aspects of TyrRS function and cellular localization.

PMID:
23750478
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3732134
Free PMC Article
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