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Muscles Ligaments Tendons J. 2012 Sep 10;2(2):149-53. Print 2012 Apr.

Massive cuff tears treated with arthroscopically assisted latissimus dorsi transfer. Surgical technique.

Author information

  • 1I.C.O.T., Latina, Italy.

Abstract

Latissimus dorsi transfer is our preferred treatment for active disabled patients with a posterosuperior massive cuff tear. We present an arthroscopically assisted technique which avoids an incision through the deltoid obtaining a better and faster clinical outcome. The patient is placed in lateral decubitus. After the arthroscopic evaluation of the lesion through a posterior and a posterolateral portal, with the limb in traction we perform the preparation of the greater tuberosity of the humerus. We place the arm in abduction and internal rotation and we proceed to the harvest of the latissimus dorsi and the tendon preparation by stitching the two sides using very resistant sutures. After restoring limb traction, under arthroscopic visualization, we pass a curved grasper through the posterolateral portal by going to the armpit in the space between the teres minor and the posterior deltoid. Once the grasper has exited the access at the level of the axilla we fix two drainage transparent tubes, each with a wire inside, and, withdrawing it back, we shuttle the two tubes in the subacromial space. After tensioning the suture wires from the anterior portals these are assembled in a knotless anchor of 5.5 mm that we place in the prepared site on the greater tuberosity of the humerus. A shoulder brace at 15° of abduction and neutral rotation protect the patient for the first month post-surgery but physical therapy can immediately start.

KEYWORDS:

arthroscopy; latissimus dorsi; posterosuperior cuff tear; shoulder; tendon transfer

PMID:
23738290
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3666511
Free PMC Article
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