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Biochemistry. 1990 May 15;29(19):4659-67.

A novel approach for sequential assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N spectra of proteins: heteronuclear triple-resonance three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Application to calmodulin.

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  • 1Laboratory of Chemical Physics, NIDDK, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892.

Abstract

A novel approach is described for obtaining sequential assignment of the backbone 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances of larger proteins. The approach is demonstrated for the protein calmodulin (16.7 kDa), uniformly (approximately 95%) labeled with 15N and 13C. Sequential assignment of the backbone residues by standard methods was not possible because of the very narrow chemical shift distribution range of both NH and C alpha H protons in this largely alpha-helical protein. We demonstrate that the combined use of four new types of heteronuclear 3D NMR spectra together with the previously described HOHAHA-HMQC 3D experiment [Marion, D., et al. (1989) Biochemistry 28, 6150-6156] can provide unambiguous sequential assignment of protein backbone resonances. Sequential connectivity is derived from one-bond J couplings and the procedure is therefore independent of the backbone conformation. All the new 3D NMR experiments use 1H detection and rely on multiple-step magnetization transfers via well-resolved one-bond J couplings, offering high sensitivity and requiring a total of only 9 days for the recording of all five 3D spectra. Because the combination of 3D spectra offers at least two and often three independent pathways for determining sequential connectivity, the new assignment procedure is easily automated. Complete assignments are reported for the proton, carbon, and nitrogen backbone resonances of calmodulin, complexed with calcium.

PMID:
2372549
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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