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Pediatrics. 1990 Aug;86(2):171-5.

Breast-feeding frequency during the first 24 hours after birth in full-term neonates.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Children's Medical Center, Okayama National Hospital, Japan.

Abstract

The relation between the frequency of breast-feeding and intake, weight loss, meconium passage, and bilirubin levels was studied in 140 healthy, full-term, breast-fed, Japanese neonates born vaginally without complications. Factors affecting the frequency of breast-feeding were also evaluated. Mothers nursed their neonates, on average, 4.3 +/- 2.5 (SD) times (range 0 to 11) during the first 24 hours after birth, and this frequency increased significantly to 7.4 +/- 3.9 times during the next 24 hours (P less than .001). There was a significant correlation between the frequency of breast-feeding during the first and second 24 hours after birth (r = .69, P less than .001). The frequency of breast-feeding during the first 24 hours correlated significantly with frequency of meconium passage (r = .37, P less than .01), maximum weight loss (r = -.22, P less than .05), breast milk intake on day 3 (r = .50, P less than .01) and day 5 (r = .34, P less than .05), transcutaneous bilirubin readings on day 6 (r = -.18, P less than .05), and weight loss from birth to time of discharge (day 7) (r = -.32, P less than .01). There was a strong dose-response relationship between feeding frequency and a decreased incidence of significant hyperbilirubinemia (transcutaneous bilirubin readings greater than or equal to 23.5) on day 6. The time of birth also affected the frequency of breast-feeding during the first 24 hours.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
2371092
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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