Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2013 Aug;42(8):929-33. doi: 10.1016/j.ijom.2013.04.010. Epub 2013 May 20.

Non-smoking non-drinking elderly females: a clinically distinct subgroup of oral squamous cell carcinoma patients.

Author information

  • 1Department of Surgery, The University of Melbourne, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. kendrickkoo@gmail.com

Abstract

There is growing interest in non-smoking non-drinking (NSND) patients presenting with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). There are, however, few published reports of OSCC in the elderly. We describe a subgroup of elderly NSND patients presenting with OSCC. Patients with SCC of the oral cavity were retrospectively assessed from the Head and Neck Oncology Tumour Stream database of the Royal Melbourne Hospital. Epidemiological and clinical data for 169 consecutive patients were reviewed and analysed. NSND patients were more likely to be females with a higher median age at presentation. They were more likely to have maxillary alveolus tumours and oral tongue tumours, with retromolar or mandibular tumours less likely. Second primary tumours for this subgroup were confined to the oral cavity. NSND elderly females experienced a worse disease-specific mortality. We have identified a distinct subgroup of elderly female patients presenting with OSCC not associated with the traditional risk factors of tobacco and alcohol, who have a worse prognosis. Altered management algorithms may prove beneficial for these patients, and further investigation and genetic analysis are required to delineate the aetiology of these carcinomas.

Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
23702369
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk