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J Card Surg. 2013 May;28(3):228-32. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12112.

Innominate artery as an alternative site for proximal anastomoses in patients with a severely calcified aorta.

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  • 1Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, JFK Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Atheromatous plaques of the ascending aorta are one of the most important risk factors for postoperative mortality and morbidity in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We have retrospectively analyzed the results of proximal anastomoses constructed on the innominate artery in patients with calcific atheromatous plaques (CAP) in their ascending aorta detected intraoperatively.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

This study is a retrospective review of 16 consecutive patients who underwent CABG operations and had CAP on their ascending aorta between November 2006 and June 2009. The atheromatous lesions were detected intraoperatively and the operation plan was changed to off-pump surgery. All the proximal anastomoses were made on the innominate artery, left internal thoracic artery (LITA) or the other saphenous vein grafts (SVG). Thirteen patients were male and three were female with a mean age of 63.7 ± 5.3 (ranged, 53-71) years.

RESULTS:

A total of 56 distal anastomoses (3.5 per patient) and 25 proximal anastomoses on the innominate artery were performed. Of the 16 patients, seven (43.7%) had received a sequential SVG; two (12.5%) patients, sequential LITA graft; and one (6.25%) patient sequential SVG and LITA graft. One of the proximal anastomoses was performed on the SVG in four patients (25%) and on the LITA graft in one patient (6.2%). One patient (6.2%) died due to cerebrovascular morbidity. No other complications were observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

The innominate artery is an alternative site for proximal anastomoses in patients with calcific atheromatous aorta.

© 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PMID:
23675680
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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