Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Biomed Sci. 2009 Sep;5(3):257-60.

Cord plasma concentrations of visfatin, adiponectin and insulin in healthy term neonates: positive correlation with birthweight.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, GATA Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aims of this study were to examine the relationships between adiponectin, insulin, visfatin and weight at birth in healthy term infants.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

Anthropometric parameters including weight, length were measured and plasma lipid profiles, insulin, visfatin and adiponectin concentrations in cord blood samples from 50 LGA and 50 AGA singleton infants born at term after uncomplicated pregnancies were assayed.

RESULTS:

Mean visfatin and adiponectin levels were significantly higher in the LGA group than AGA group (11.8 ± 8 vs. 6.3 ± 5.5 ng/ml, p<0.001; 28.4 ± 3.9 vs. 25.7 ± 3.6 μg/ml, p=0.001; respectively). Insulin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels did not differ significantly between LGA and AGA infants. Cord plasma adiponectin, visfatin and insulin levels correlated significantly and positively with birthweight (p=0.01, p<0.001, p<0.001; respectively) and with birthlength (p=0.01, p<0.001, p=0.01; respectively). Cord plasma adiponectin concentration correlated positively with visfatin level (p=0.005), but not with insulin level (p=0.8), and cord plasma visfatin concentration correlated positively with insulin level (p<0.001).

CONCLUSION:

High adiponectin and visfatin levels are present in the cord blood in LGA group. Cord plasma adiponectin and visfatin levels are positively correlated with birthweight. This suggests that adiponectin and visfatin may be involved in regulating fetal growth.

KEYWORDS:

adiponectin; birthweight; insulin; visfatin

PMID:
23675145
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3614788
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk