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Mov Disord. 2013 Nov;28(13):1816-22. doi: 10.1002/mds.25491. Epub 2013 May 14.

Diffusion tensor imaging of Parkinson's disease, atypical parkinsonism, and essential tremor.

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  • 1Physical Therapy Program, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, Illinois, USA.

Abstract

Diffusion tensor imaging could be useful in characterizing movement disorders because it noninvasively examines multiple brain regions simultaneously. We report a multitarget imaging approach focused on the basal ganglia and cerebellum in Parkinson's disease, parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and essential tremor and in healthy controls. Seventy-two subjects were studied with a diffusion tensor imaging protocol at 3 Tesla. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to directly compare groups. Sensitivity and specificity values were quantified for control versus movement disorder (92% sensitivity, 88% specificity), control versus parkinsonism (93% sensitivity, 91% specificity), Parkinson's disease versus atypical parkinsonism (90% sensitivity, 100% specificity), Parkinson's disease versus multiple system atrophy (94% sensitivity, 100% specificity), Parkinson's disease versus progressive supranuclear palsy (87% sensitivity, 100% specificity), multiple system atrophy versus progressive supranuclear palsy (90% sensitivity, 100% specificity), and Parkinson's disease versus essential tremor (92% sensitivity, 87% specificity). The brain targets varied for each comparison, but the substantia nigra, putamen, caudate, and middle cerebellar peduncle were the most frequently selected brain regions across classifications. These results indicate that using diffusion tensor imaging of the basal ganglia and cerebellum accurately classifies subjects diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, atypical parkinsonism, and essential tremor and clearly distinguishes them from control subjects.

© 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

KEYWORDS:

DTI; basal ganglia; cerebellum; essential tremor; parkinsonism

PMID:
23674400
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3748146
Free PMC Article
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