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Laryngoscope. 2013 Nov;123(11):2787-92. doi: 10.1002/lary.24148. Epub 2013 May 14.

Comparing nebulized water versus saline after laryngeal desiccation challenge in Sjögren's Syndrome.

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  • 1Department of Communication Disorders, Brigham Young University, Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A; Voice Disorders Center, Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS:

This study examined the effects of a laryngeal desiccation challenge and two nebulized hydration treatments on phonation threshold pressure (PTP), vocal effort, and throat dryness in patients with chronic airway dryness.

STUDY DESIGN:

Double-blind, within-subjects crossover design.

METHODS:

Eleven individuals with Primary Sjögren's Syndrome received a 15-minute laryngeal desiccation challenge (breathing dry air-<1% relative humidity-transorally), followed by nebulized isotonic saline or nebulized water treatments (3 mL) on 2 consecutive weeks. PTP, as well as self-perceived vocal effort, mouth, and throat dryness were assessed before and after the desiccation challenge, and at 5, 35, and 65 minutes after the nebulized treatment.

RESULTS:

The laryngeal desiccation challenge produced statistically significant increases in PTP, vocal effort, and mouth and throat dryness (P < 0.05). Nebulized saline produced greater-but not statistically significant-treatment effects than water. PTP was more correlated with throat dryness than vocal effort.

CONCLUSION:

Patients with chronic airway dryness experienced phonatory changes following dry air exposure. Nebulized isotonic saline may offset this effect. Future research should explore dose-response relationships among dry air exposure, nebulized treatments, voice change, and self-perceived throat dryness.

Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

Hydration; PTP; Sjögren's Syndrome; laryngeal desiccation; throat dryness; vocal effort; vocal fold surface fluid

PMID:
23674107
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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