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Reprod Sci. 2013 Dec;20(12):1465-70. doi: 10.1177/1933719113488452. Epub 2013 May 13.

The role of placental protein 14 in the pathogenesis of endometriosis.

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  • 11Department of Gynecology, Shanghai Zhabei Central Hospital, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

Placental protein 14 (PP-14) is the principal secretory phase product of endometrium and has been shown to inhibit cell immune function. But its role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis is controversy. The objective of this study is to determine the concentrations of PP-14 in peritoneal fluid (PF) and serum and PP-14 protein expression in endometriotic lesions in women with ovarian endometriosis (n = 75) when compared to women without endometriosis (n = 49) between day 7 and day 20 of their menstrual cycle. Concentrations of PP-14 in PF and serum as well as PP-14 protein expression in endometriotic lesions in women with and without endometriosis were evaluated by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. Serum PP-14 concentrations were significantly increased in women with endometriosis (7.5 ± 1.4 ng/mL) compared to those in women without endometriosis (5.8 ± 0.9 ng/mL; P < .05) and statistically decreased after surgery and further reduced by using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist therapy (P < .05). However, the concentrations of PP-14 in PF did not reach a significant difference between women with and without endometriosis (P > .05). In women with endometriosis, scores of PP-14 protein expression in the lesions (n = 50, 2.2 [0~5.8]) were significantly correlated with serum PP-14 concentrations (n = 50, 7.6 ± 1.3 ng/mL; P < .01). Our results suggest that PP-14 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis.

KEYWORDS:

endometriosis; endometrium; peritoneal fluid; placental protein 14; serum

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