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J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2013 Sep;68(9):1112-21. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glt059. Epub 2013 May 8.

Associations between frailty and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentrations in older Australian men: the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project.

Author information

  • 1Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2139, Australia. vasant.hirani@sydney.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Poor vitamin D status and frailty are common in older people and associated with adverse health outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels and frailty and components of frailty in older Australian men.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional analysis of the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project, a large epidemiological study conducted in Sydney, Australia, between January 2005 and May 2007. Participants included 1,659 community-dwelling men. Main outcome measurements were frailty (assessed using the Cardiovascular Health Study), frailty criteria comprising five core components: weight loss; reduced muscular strength/weakness; slow walking speed; exhaustion; and low activity level, and the separate components of frailty. Covariates included serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels measured by radioimmunoassay, age, country of birth, season of blood collection, sun exposure, body mass index, vitamin D supplement use, income, measures of health, parathyroid hormone, estimated glomerular function.

RESULTS:

Frailty was present in 9.2% of the sample. Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels were independently associated with frailty and with four of the five components of frailty (except weight loss).

CONCLUSIONS:

1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were independently associated with frailty in older men. This suggests that there might be a number of different biological mechanisms for how low vitamin D status might contribute to the frailty syndrome. In addition, the possibility that improving vitamin D status may specifically influence the incidence and progression of frailty needs to be explored.

KEYWORDS:

Frailty; Older men.; Vitamin D

PMID:
23657973
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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