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Clin Anat. 2014 Mar;27(2):227-33. doi: 10.1002/ca.22253. Epub 2013 May 7.

Anatomical relationship and positions of the lumbar and sacral segments of the spinal cord according to the vertebral bodies and the spinal roots.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurological Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin.

Abstract

Segments of the spinal cord generally do not correspond to the respective vertebral level and there are many anatomical variations in terms of the segment and the level of vertebra. The aim of this study is to investigate the variations and levels of lumbar and sacral spinal cord segments with reference to the axilla of the T11, T12, and L1 spinal nerve roots and adjacent vertebrae. Morphometric measurements were made on 16 formalin fixed adult cadaveric spinal cords. We observed termination of the spinal cord between the axilla of the L1 and L2 spinal nerve roots in 15 specimens (93.8%). In all cadavers the emergence of the T11, T12, and the L1 spinal nerve roots was at the level of the lower one-third of the same vertebral body. In 15 specimens (93.8%), the beginning of the lumbar spinal cord segment was found to be above the T11 spinal nerve root axilla and corresponded to the upper one-third of the T11 vertebral body. The beginning of the sacral spinal cord segment occurred above the L1 spinal nerve root axilla and corresponded to the upper one-third of the L1 vertebral body. The results of this study showed that when the conus medullaris is located at the L1-L2 level, the beginning of the lumbar spinal cord segment always corresponds to the body of T11 vertebra. This study provides detailed information about the correspondence of the spinal cord segments with reference to the axilla of the spinal nerve roots.

Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

lumbar segment; root; sacral segment; spinal cord; topographical anatomy

PMID:
23649511
[PubMed - in process]
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