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Ann Vasc Dis. 2013;6(1):52-6. doi: 10.3400/avd.oa.12.00070. Epub 2012 Dec 26.

Exercise-ankle brachial pressure index with one-minute treadmill walking in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

Author information

  • 1Odawara Cardiovascular Hospital, Odawara, Kanagawa, Japan ; Development Center to Support Health and Welfare, Kanagawa Institute of Technology, Atsugi, Kanagawa, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) is widely used as a standard screening method for arterial occlusive lesion above the knee. However, the sensitivity of ABI is low in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Exercise stress (Ex-ABI) may reduce the false negative results.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

After measuring resting ABI and toe-brachial pressure index (TBI), ankle pressure and ABI immediately after walking (Post-AP, Post-ABI) were measured using one-minute treadmill walking in 52 lower limbs of 26 HD patients. The definition of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAD) required an ABI value of less than 0.90, TBI value of less than 0.60, and decrease of more than 15% of the Post-ABI value and 20 mmHg of Post-AP in Ex-ABI. Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed in 32 lower limbs of 16 HD patients. PAD is defined as presence of stenosis of more than 75% in the case of lesions from an iliac artery to knee on CTA.

RESULTS:

The accuracy of Ex-ABI (Sensitivity, 85.7%; Specificity, 77.7%) was higher than those of ABI (Sensitivity, 42.9%; Specificity, 83.3%) or TBI (Sensitivity, 78.6%; Specificity, 61.1%).

CONCLUSION:

Ex-ABI with one-minute treadmill walking is the most useful tool for the screening of arterial occlusive lesions above the knee in maintenance HD patients.

KEYWORDS:

diagnosis; exercise; hemodialysis; peripheral arterial disease; screening

PMID:
23641284
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3635000
Free PMC Article
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