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Cancer. 2012 Dec 1;118(23):5793-9. doi: 10.1002/cncr.27631. Epub 2012 May 17.

Late dysphagia after radiotherapy-based treatment of head and neck cancer.

Author information

  • 1Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. karnold@mdanderson.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Changing trends in head and neck cancer (HNC) merit an understanding of the late effects of therapy, but few studies examine dysphagia beyond 2 years of treatment.

METHODS:

A case series was examined to describe the pathophysiology and outcomes in dysphagic HNC survivors referred for modified barium swallow (MBS) studies ≥ 5 years after definitive radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (January 2001 through May 2011). Functional measures included the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), performance status scale-head and neck (PSS-HN), National Institutes of Health Swallowing Safety Scale (NIH-SSS), and MBS impairment profile (MBSImp).

RESULTS:

Twenty-nine patients previously treated with radiotherapy (38%) or chemoradiotherapy (62%) were included (median years posttreatment, 9; range, 5-19). The majority (86%) had oropharyngeal cancer; 52% were never-smokers. Seventy-five percent had T2 or T3 tumors; 52% were N+. The median age at diagnosis was 55 (range, 38-72). Abnormal late examination findings included: dysarthria/dysphonia (76%), cranial neuropathy (48%), trismus (38%), and radionecrosis (10%). MBS studies confirmed pharyngeal residue and aspiration in all dysphagic cases owing to physiologic impairment (median PAS, 8; median NIH-SSS, 10; median MBSImp, 18), whereas stricture was confirmed endoscopically in 7 (24%). Twenty-five (86%) developed pneumonia, half requiring hospitalization. Swallow postures/strategies helped 69% of cases, but no patient achieved durable improvement across functional measures at last follow-up. Ultimately, 19 (66%) were gastrostomy-dependent.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although functional organ preservation is commonly achieved, severe dysphagia represents a challenging late effect that may develop or progress years after radiation-based therapy for HNC. These data suggest that novel approaches are needed to minimize and better address this complication that is commonly refractory to many standard dysphagia therapies.

Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

PMID:
23640737
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4034519
Free PMC Article

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