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PLoS One. 2013 Apr 25;8(4):e62775. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0062775. Print 2013.

Determinants of medication adherence to antihypertensive medications among a Chinese population using Morisky Medication Adherence Scale.

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  • 1School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Poor adherence to medications is one of the major public health challenges. Only one-third of the population reported successful control of blood pressure, mostly caused by poor drug adherence. However, there are relatively few reports studying the adherence levels and their associated factors among Chinese patients. This study aimed to study the adherence profiles and the factors associated with antihypertensive drug adherence among Chinese patients.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study was conducted in an outpatient clinic located in the New Territories Region of Hong Kong. Adult patients who were currently taking at least one antihypertensive drug were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire, consisting of basic socio-demographic profile, self-perceived health status, and self-reported medication adherence. The outcome measure was the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Good adherence was defined as MMAS scores greater than 6 points (out of a total score of 8 points).

RESULTS:

From 1114 patients, 725 (65.1%) had good adherence to antihypertensive agents. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted. Younger age, shorter duration of antihypertensive agents used, job status being employed, and poor or very poor self-perceived health status were negatively associated with drug adherence.

CONCLUSION:

This study reported a high proportion of poor medication adherence among hypertensive subjects. Patients with factors associated with poor adherence should be more closely monitored to optimize their drug taking behavior.

PMID:
23638143
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3636185
Free PMC Article
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