Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Proc Inst Mech Eng H. 2013 Jun;227(6):704-11. doi: 10.1177/0954411913481186. Epub 2013 Mar 19.

The generation of loads in excess of the osteogenic threshold by physical movement.

Author information

  • 1Department of Industrial Design, Coventry University, Coventry, UK. j.shippen@coventry.ac.uk

Abstract

This study investigates the use of physical movement to cause joint and bone loads that stimulate bone growth in order to reduce the adverse effects of osteoporosis. It has been established that stresses in bones in excess of the osteogenic threshold will stimulate bone growth; however, protocols for the generation of these stresses had not been established. Two trial movements were examined in the study: the plié and a movement requiring the subject to move a leg sequentially to 45° displaced positions - the star excursion balance test. Using inverse dynamics and an optimisation approach, the loads in the muscles crossing the hip and knee joints and the corresponding joint contact forces were calculated. It was found that the osteogenic threshold was exceeded in both these trials identifying them as suitable exercises in the maintenance of bone health. In the order of increasing bone load at the hip, and hence increasing bone growth stimulation, are the following demi plié, star excursion balance test with maximum reach criterion, grande plié and star excursion balance test with maximum speed criterion. In the order of increasing bone load at the knee are demi plié, grande plié, star excursion balance test with maximum reach criterion and star excursion balance test with maximum speed criterion. However, due to the high loads encountered, these exercises are not recommended for subjects with advanced osteoporosis although the boundary between therapeutic bone loading leading to increase in bone mineral density and loads capable of causing fracture is unclear.

KEYWORDS:

Biomechanics; bone health; osteogenic; physical activity

PMID:
23636751
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk