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J Sci Med Sport. 2014 Jan;17(1):78-84. doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.03.004. Epub 2013 Apr 22.

Cross-sectional associations of total sitting and leisure screen time with cardiometabolic risk in adults. Results from the HUNT Study, Norway.

Author information

  • 1Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: josephine.chau@sydney.edu.au.
  • 2Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia.
  • 3HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway.
  • 4Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia; Department of Public and Occupational Health, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine associations of total sitting time, TV-viewing and leisure-time computer use with cardiometabolic risk biomarkers in adults.

DESIGN:

Population based cross-sectional study.

METHODS:

Waist circumference, BMI, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, blood pressure, non-fasting glucose, gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT) and triglycerides were measured in 48,882 adults aged 20 years or older from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 2006-2008 (HUNT3). Adjusted multiple regression models were used to test for associations between these biomarkers and self-reported total sitting time, TV-viewing and leisure-time computer use in the whole sample and by cardiometabolic disease status sub-groups.

RESULTS:

In the whole sample, reporting total sitting time ≥10 h/day was associated with poorer BMI, waist circumference, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, diastolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, non-fasting glucose, GGT and triglyceride levels compared to those reporting total sitting time <4h/day (all p<0.05). TV-viewing ≥4 h/day was associated with poorer BMI, waist circumference, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, GGT and triglycerides compared to TV-viewing <1h/day (all p<0.05). Leisure-time computer use ≥1 h/day was associated with poorer BMI, total cholesterol, diastolic blood pressure, GGT and triglycerides compared with those reporting no leisure-time computing. Sub-group analyses by cardiometabolic disease status showed similar patterns in participants free of cardiometabolic disease, while similar albeit non-significant patterns were observed in those with cardiometabolic disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

Total sitting time, TV-viewing and leisure-time computer use are associated with poorer cardiometabolic risk profiles in adults. Reducing sedentary behaviour throughout the day and limiting TV-viewing and leisure-time computer use may have health benefits.

Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

BMI; CMD; Cardiovascular diseases; Epidemiology; GGT; HDL; HUNT; Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, Norway (HelseUndersøkelsen i Nord-Trøndelag); Physical activity; Sedentary lifestyle; WC; body mass index; cardiometabolic disease; gamma glutamyltransferase; high density lipoprotein; waist circumference

PMID:
23619159
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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