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Arthritis Rheum. 2013 May;65(5):1253-61. doi: 10.1002/art.37899.

Willingness and access to joint replacement among African American patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized, controlled intervention.

Author information

  • 1Philadelphia VA Medical Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia 19104, USA. said.ibrahim2@va.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

African American patients are significantly less likely to undergo knee replacement for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Racial difference in preference (willingness) has emerged as a key factor. This study was undertaken to examine the efficacy of a patient-centered educational intervention on patient willingness and the likelihood of receiving a referral to an orthopedic clinic.

METHODS:

A total of 639 African American patients with moderate-to-severe knee OA from 3 Veterans Affairs primary care clinics were enrolled in a randomized, controlled trial with a 2 × 2 factorial design. Patients were shown a knee OA decision-aid video with or without brief counseling. The main outcome measures were change in patient willingness and receipt of a referral to an orthopedic clinic. Also assessed were whether patients discussed knee pain with their primary care provider or saw an orthopedic surgeon within 12 months of the intervention.

RESULTS:

At baseline, 67% of the participants were definitely/probably willing to consider knee replacement, with no difference among the groups. The intervention increased patient willingness (75%) in all groups at 1 month. For those who received the decision aid intervention alone, the gains were sustained for up to 3 months. By 12 months postintervention, patients who received any intervention were more likely to report engaging their provider in a discussion about knee pain (92% versus 85%), to receive a referral to an orthopedic surgeon (18% versus 13%), and for those with a referral, to attend an orthopedic consult (61% versus 50%).

CONCLUSION:

An educational intervention significantly increased the willingness of African American patients to consider knee replacement. It also improved the likelihood of patient-provider discussion about knee pain and access to surgical evaluation.

Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

PMID:
23613362
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3641679
Free PMC Article
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